UK arrested Tommy Robinson for reporting child-rape gangs that the government caters to. The UK banned reporting of his arrest, denied him a lawyer, and is trying to have him assassinated in prison. Regardless of how you feel about his views, this is a totalitarian government.

Tommy Robinson isn't the first to that the UK has jailed after a secret trial. Melanie Shaw tried to expose child abuse in a Nottinghamshire kids home -- it wasn't foreigners doing the molesting, but many members of the UK's parliament. The government kidnapped her child and permanently took it away. Police from 3 forces have treated her like a terrorist and themselves broken the law. Police even constantly come by to rob her phone and money. She was tried in a case so secret the court staff had no knowledge of it. Her lawyer, like Tommy's, wasn't present. She has been held for over 2 years in Peterborough Prison. read, read

First War of the Scottish Succession

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First War of the Scottish Succession
Date1296–1328
LocationKingdom of Scotland, Kingdom of England, Lordship of Ireland
Result Abdication of John Balliol. Robert the Bruce succeeds as established King of Scotland with the Treaty of Edinburgh–Northampton. Loss of Plantagenet's Lord Paramount of Scotland claim.
Belligerents
1296–1297:
John Balliol, King of Scotland
William Douglas the Hardy
1296–1297:
Baron de Clifford
Earl of Surrey
1297–1306:
William Wallace
Andrew Moray
Lord of Badenoch
Sir Simon Fraser
Sir William Oliphant
1297–1306:
Lord Paramount of Scotland
Earl of Surrey
Hugh de Cressingham
Sir William Latimer
Sir John Segrave
1307–1328:
Robert the Bruce
Edward Bruce
Lord of Douglas
High Steward of Scotland
Earl of Moray
1307–1328:
Lord Paramount of Scotland
Earl of Pembroke
Lord of Argyll
Earl of Buchan
Earl of Ulster
Earl of March
Earl of Desmond
Earl of Louth
Earl of Carrick
Earl of Richmond

The First War of the Scottish Succession was a conflict in the Kingdom of Scotland, which occured during the 13th and 14th centuries. They originated as a result of a sucession crisis following the death of Alexander III of Scotland, the last king of the House of Dunkeld. His heiress, Margaret, Maid of Norway, had been promised in marriage to Edward, Prince of Wales. This would have meant that Scotland would become a Plantagenet holding, effectively giving the dynasty sway over the entire British Isles and a significant part of the Kingdom of France within a generation. She died at Orkney on her way to Scotland setting off a complex set of events.

This rendered the paternal line of Dunkeld completely extinct and a search for a legitimate heir, legislatively complex and difficult to manifest. Two members of the nobility—both of whose ancestors arrived with the Normans—emerged to make a claim; Robert, 5th Lord of Annandale from the House of Bruce and John, Lord of Galloway from the House of Balliol. Attempting to avoid a civil war, the Guardians of Scotland wrote to Edward I of England to ask him to arbitrate in the dispute. Various claimants made their case in the Great Cause. 104 arbiters were assigned to decide the case, and eventually the genealogically superior Balliol was crowned King of Scotland.

Work in Progress Work in Progress – comments welcome

Background

Maid of Norway, heiress to Scotland dies

Great Cause, contestants stake their claim

Balliol crowned, refused to pay homage

Conflict

Lord Paramount dethrones Balliol

Offensive under William Wallace

Bruce emerges, wins the crown

Quotes

Part of this article consists of modified text from Metapedia (which sadly became a Zionist shill), page http:en.metapedia.org/wiki/First War of the Scottish Succession and/or Wikipedia (is liberal-bolshevistic), page http:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First War of the Scottish Succession, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.