Swedish Rite

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Cross of the Swedish Order of Freemasons
The red cross of the above form, in Scandinavia known as a St George's cross, is a commonly used symbol for Freemasonry in the Swedish Rite, alongside the internationally otherwise more common square and compasses.

The Swedish Rite is a variation of Freemasonry that is worked in Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland. A slight variation is common in parts of Germany under the Große Landesloge der Freimaurer von Deutschland. Also other craft masonic bodies are working in the nordic countries (see further under freemasonry in Sweden and freemasonry in Denmark). However only one Grand Lodge in each country is working the Swedish Rite, each of which governs its own jurisdiction.

The Rite is divided into three divisions: St. John's (Craft) degrees (I–III), St. Andrew's (Scottish) degrees (IV–VI) and the Chapter degrees (VII–X). In addition one may attain the XIth degree, although only a very few gain this. Progression from one degree to the next is not automatic. A brother not only has to be in regular attendance, but also has to show that he has a certain proficiency and knowledge of Freemasonry. The Swedish Rite demands members be Christian and not just that they believe in a supreme being. Like other regular Masonic organisations, only men are allowed membership.

Since 7 November 2006 all laws of the Swedish Order of Freemasons are publicly available on the Internet.[1] Among others, the laws prohibit any member to gain advantages outside the lodge by using the lodge as an instrument. The laws also stress the charity works of the members and the observance of the Golden Rule.

Degrees

  • St. John's degrees
    • I Apprentice
    • II Fellow Craft
    • III Master Mason
  • St. Andrew's degrees
    • IV/V Apprentice and Companion of St. Andrew (one degree)
    • VI Master of St. Andrew
  • Chapter degrees
    • VII Very Illustrious Brother, Knight of the East
    • VIII Most Illustrious Brother, Knight of the West
    • IX Enlightened Brother of St. John's Lodge
    • X Very Enlightened Brother of St. Andrew's Lodge
  • Grand Council honorary degree
    • XI Most Enlightened Brother, Knight Commander of the Red Cross

Grand Lodges using the rite

The Swedish Rite is used by:

An earlier version of the rite, the Zinnendorf Rite, is used by:

See also

References

  1. Swedish Order of Freemasons. "Ordens Allmänna Lagar" (General Laws of the Order), Stockholm, 7 November 2006. Retrieved on 2010-08-11.

External links

Grand Lodges using the Swedish Rite
Other links
Part of this article consists of modified text from Metapedia (which sadly became a Zionist shill), page http:en.metapedia.org/wiki/Swedish Rite and/or Wikipedia (is liberal-bolshevistic), page http:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish Rite, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.