Political correctness

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Luckily JRR Tolkien never had to face the political correctness police.
Political correctness is like a religion.

Political correctness originally came from the Soviet Union. There it was called counter-revolutionary. Saying something politically incorrect simply means saying a truth that those in power want to hide.

The mainstream media is always politically correct.

Examples

In 2015, Chinese housing developers in Australia caused outrage for saying what everyone there knew but no one dared say, that no one wanted to live near Australian Aborigines.[1]

Unequal political correctness

Political correctness has an anti-white bias since Cultural Marxism is centered entirely around genociding all white people and eradicating European culture.

Causes of increasing and increasingly leftist political correctness

Cultural Marxists have taken over all the schools, universities, news media, and most of the governments of all white countries. This began in 1919 and has continued ever since as a strong push, just building up more and more. Then the Cultural Marxists pushed mass immigration and brought demographic genocide of what countries so now white people were overwhelmed with invaders that hated them and wanted to genocide and then replace them.

Billionaire Communists like George Soros ✡  fund this stuff. Also most wealthy corporation owners fire people for being politically incorrect--they also are heavily pushing it.


There's also white guilt (ironically for ending slavery that blacks started) and their pathological altruism. And there's Holocaustianity.

IQ and political correctness

Charlton wrote in 2009 that "In previous editorials I have written about the absent-minded and socially-inept 'nutty professor' stereotype in science, and the phenomenon of 'psychological neoteny' whereby intelligent modern people (including scientists) decline to grow-up and instead remain in a state of perpetual novelty-seeking adolescence. These can be seen as specific examples of the general phenomenon of 'clever sillies' whereby intelligent people with high levels of technical ability are seen (by the majority of the rest of the population) as having foolish ideas and behaviours outside the realm of their professional expertise. In short, it has often been observed that high IQ types are lacking in 'common sense'--and especially when it comes to dealing with other human beings. General intelligence is not just a cognitive ability; it is also a cognitive disposition. So, the greater cognitive abilities of higher IQ tend also to be accompanied by a distinctive high IQ personality type including the trait of 'Openness to experience', 'enlightened' or progressive left-wing political values, and atheism.[2]

Drawing on the ideas of Kanazawa, my suggested explanation for this association between intelligence and personality is that an increasing relative level of IQ brings with it a tendency differentially to over-use general intelligence in problem-solving, and to over-ride those instinctive and spontaneous forms of evolved behaviour which could be termed common sense. Preferential use of abstract analysis is often useful when dealing with the many evolutionary novelties to be found in modernizing societies; but is not usually useful for dealing with social and psychological problems for which humans have evolved 'domain-specific' adaptive behaviours. And since evolved common sense usually produces the right answers in the social domain; this implies that, when it comes to solving social problems, the most intelligent people are more likely than those of average intelligence to have novel but silly ideas, and therefore to believe and behave maladaptively.[2]

I further suggest that this random silliness of the most intelligent people may be amplified to generate systematic wrongness when intellectuals are in addition 'advertising' their own high intelligence in the evolutionarily novel context of a modern IQ meritocracy. The cognitively-stratified context of communicating almost-exclusively with others of similar intelligence, generates opinions and behaviours among the highest IQ people which are not just lacking in common sense but perversely wrong. Hence the phenomenon of 'political correctness' (PC); whereby false and foolish ideas have come to dominate, and moralistically be enforced upon, the ruling elites of whole nations."[2]

This has been criticized: "Michael Woodley critiques Bruce Charlton's hypothesis that "clever-sillies" use their high IQs and openness to experience to construct social and political views that are farther from the truth than views generated be common sense and social intelligence. According to Woodley: 1) smart people are not necessarily less socially intelligent; 2) smart people might tend to be politically correct only in cultures where liberalism is the dominant view; 3) high-IQ individuals who score high on conscientiousness (and conformity) will adopt PC views in a liberal environment and conservative views in a conservative environment; 4) traditional cultures value dominance, while the modern West values counter-dominance (or egalitarianism); and 5) adopting politically correct views is a way to signal to others that you are altruistic and support egalitarianism, which is then rewarded with enhanced social status and greater access to resources."[3][4]

Political correctness and language

One example of political correctness is changing the language itself like new speak demonstrated in George Orwell's 1984. For example, Negro" was perceived as stereotypically offensive and changed to "Black" and increasingly to "African-American".

If there are in fact some truths in such previous offensive stereotypes, then such new terms may also become negatively associated.

Political correctness and media

News

Crimes by non-Whites are often censored by the mainstream media. See the articles Race and crime and Hate crime.

Entertainment

For example engineers and computer experts are often depicted as Black or female in entertainment media.

See also the article on Homosexuality.

Changes "within the form"

Aristotle stated that "People do not easily change, but love their own ancient customs; and it is by small degrees only that one thing takes the place of another; so that the ancient laws will remain, while the power will be in the hands of those who have brought about a revolution in the state." Thus, in Antiquity, if change was desired by the rulers, then the outward forms of the ancient laws were often retained while the meanings were changed and/or modifying laws added.

Today there is much less reluctance to completely replace old laws and words with new laws and words (as noted above) but the tactic of attempting to change the meaning of, for example, old words is also used. One example is attempts to change the meaning of race from a biological (genetic) concept to a mere social construct.

Another example is Garet Garrett who used the expression "revolution within the form" and criticized an argued change of meaning of the U.S. Constitution from a document that restricted government power over the individual, to one that endorsed and legitimated such power.[5]

Gallery

Videos

Politically Correct Episode (with Brittani Louise Taylor) - Retarded Policeman #35
Die Geschichte der Political Correctness 1v3
Die Geschichte der Political Correctness 2v3
Die Geschichte der Political Correctness 3v3

See also

References

  1. http://www.dailystormer.com/outrage-as-chinese-developers-in-australia-acknowledge-that-nobody-wants-to-live-near-abos/
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Charlton BG (2009) Clever sillies: why high IQ people tend to be deficient in common sense.] Med Hypotheses 73 (6):867-70. DOI:10.1016/j.mehy.2009.08.016 http://pubmed.gov/19733444 http://medicalhypotheses.blogspot.nl/2009/11/clever-sillies-why-high-iq-lack-common.html
  3. A critique of Charlton's "clever sillies". http://inductivist.blogspot.nl/2010/11/critique-of-charltons-clever-sillies.html
  4. Michael A. Woodley. Intelligence, Vol. 38, No. 5. (05 September 2010), pp. 471-480, doi:10.1016/j.intell.2010.06.002 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S016028961000053X
  5. The Revolution Was. http://mises.org/library/republic-becomes-empire

External links