We need to get out and vote this year or USA Republicans will lose majority in Congress and Trump will be impeached.

See this video. By the middle of it, Tommy Robinson learns that the Metropolitan Intelligence Bureau (UK spy agency) is behind every jihadist terrorist attack in the UK.


From en-Rightpedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Passover is the Jewish celebration of the Exodus of the Israelites from Egypt. It begins at dusk, on the 15th of the Hebrew month of Nisan and lasts for either seven days (in the Jewish State in Palestine) or eight days (in the diaspora).

Biblical basis

The Book of Exodus attests that God helped the Israelite tribe escape from slavery in Egypt. Indeed, nine plagues were inflicted upon Egypt, including turning the water of the Nile into blood, swarms of frogs, gnats, flies, diseased livestock, and locusts, festering boils, hail, and darkness. As several of the plagues involved natural phenomena, they may not have been supernatural in themselves, except in their timing. Biblical archaeologists, such as Protestant scholar William F. Albright have pointed to evidence for the historicity of the plagues, such as an ancient water-trough found in El Arish bears hieroglyphic markings detailing a period of darkness. Secular archaeologists have recently argued that the plagues occurred at the ancient city of Pi-Rameses in the Nile Delta, which was the capital of Egypt during the reign of Rameses II in the 13th century BC (1279-1213); in conformity with contemporary secular religion, however, the events have been attributed to global warming.[1]

As to the final and most horrific plague, the Lord told Moses that He would kill the firstborn of both man and beast. Like the earlier nine plagues, this would affect all levels of Egyptian society.

Thus said the Lord: At midnight I will enter into Egypt. And every firstborn in the land of the Egyptians shall die, from the firstborn of Pharao who sitteth on his throne, even to the first born of the handmaid that is at the mill, and all the firstborn of beasts. And there shall be a great cry in all the land of Egypt, such as neither hath been before, nor shall be hereafter. But with all the children of Israel there shall not a dog make the least noise, from man even to beast: that you may know how wonderful a difference the Lord maketh between the Egyptians and Israel.[2]

The plague was explained as a judgment against the gods of Egypt.[3] The Israelites were instructed to mark their doorposts with the blood of a slaughtered spring lamb so that during the massacre God's wrath would pass over the first-born in these homes, hence the name of the festival. According to Exodus, the Lord explained the significance of these events to Moses.

And when your children shall say to you: What is the meaning of this service? You shall say to them: It is the victim of the passage of the Lord, when he passed over the houses of the children of Israel in Egypt, striking the Egyptians, and saving our houses. And the people bowing themselves, adored.[4]

Hence the festival, which the Lord enjoined as a ceremony to be observed by the children of Israel forever,[5] may be seen as an embodiment of the Jewish ethic of exclusivity and hostility to gentiles that may be seen in the Jews to this day. The tenth plague came to pass at midnight on 15th Nisan, and Pharaoh capitulated and bade the Israelites to leave. The Jewish tribe had no time to wait for bread dough to rise (leaven) and in commemoration, for the duration of Passover no leavened bread is eaten. Thus Matzo (flat unleavened bread) is eaten during Passover. However, Pharaoh changed his mind, and pursued Israel with his army. Moses then raises his staff at God's command, and God parts the Red Sea, allowing the Israelites to cross, while the Egyptians pursue but are destroyed when the water returns to normal.

In the New Testament

The Last Supper, during which Jesus Christ instituted the Eucharist in the presence of the Twelve Apostles, was a Passover meal. This is the origin of the use of unleavened bread in the Christian Eucharist.

See also


  1. Richard Gray. Biblical plagues really happened say scientists The Telegraph. March 27, 2010. Accessed April 4, 2014.
  2. Exodus 11:4-7.
  3. Exodus 12:12.
  4. Exodus 12:26-27.
  5. Exodus 12:24-25.

External links