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Orange Order

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Orange Institution
450px-Flag of the Orange Order.png
The Orange Order flag – also known as the Boyne Standard – consisting of an orange background with a St George's Cross and the purple star of the Williamite forces.
Type Freemasonic fraternal organisation
Purpose Disemination and promotion of Judeo-Masonry, Zionism, multiracialism and attacking the interests of the Gaelic Irish Catholics of Ireland
Location
Region served
United Kingdom (based mainly in Northern Ireland and Scotland),
Ireland,
United States,
Canada,
Australia,
New Zealand,
Ghana,
Togo,
other Commonwealth countries
Website http://www.grandorangelodge.co.uk/

The Orange Institution, better known as the Orange Order, is a fraternal organisation formed in 1795 in County Armagh, Kingdom of Ireland. It was founded by Freemasons and derives its rites and rituals from the 1st and 2nd degrees of the York Rite. The organisation only allows "Protestants" to join, but whether it is Protestant religiously is debated by some people of a more fundamentalistic view who object to its esotericism.[1]

There are similar and related Loyalist / Unionist fraternal organisations, such as the Apprentice Boys of Derry catering typically to lower class people and the Royal Black Preceptory for the more affluent, with the Orange Order falling somewhere inbetween. The organisation was historically very powerful in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Canada, most places where Lowland Scots live; the United States is an exception, because the Orange Order supports British Imperialism, which most Scotch-Irish in the United States have historically opposed (see for example, Andrew Jackson).

History

The Orange Order was founded on 21 September 1795 shortly after the 'Battle of the Diamond' outside a small village in County Armagh called Loughgall. It took its name from William of Orange, the Dutch Protestant king who fought the Roman Catholic James II across Ireland, culminating in James' defeat at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. It was formed by three well-known local men of the area, James "Buddra" Wilson, Dan Winter, and James Sloan. All three men were dedicated Freemasons.

Multiracialism

The Orange Order has a long tradition of miscegenation and integration with Blacks and Jews; when Jews were excluded from other societies, Freemasonry and the Orange Order admitted them. George Benjamin (Moses Cohen) was a Jewish Orangeman and the first Jew elected to a Canadian parliament. In 1836, he became grand master in British North America for the Orange Order, replacing Ogle Robert Gowan. At this time, the Orange Order had a strong voice in Upper Canada. Number 6 of the aims and objectives of the Loyal Orange Lodge in modern Canada is "A non-sectarian public school system where children of all races, creeds and colours can learn and grow together."[4]

Ek Fiawoo, a native of Ghana, was invited to join the Orange Institution of Liverpool. He was ordained a minister of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church and founder of the Zion College of West Africa where he successfully encourages students to join the Orange Order. In 1980, Ghana had 1,000 Orangemen in 20 lodges. The Orange Lodge in Togo was inaugurated in Larne in 1983 by Rev. Martin Smyth, MP. The Grand Master of West Africa, Emmanuel Essien, said while he was in the north of Ireland that "nearly every jurisdiction has had him as a guest."

The Orange Order praised him with he has impressed the brethren with his enthusiasm for the Orange and Protestant cause "and in return a happy Emmanuel wanted to express his gratitude to the Orangemen of Ulster ... for what they have done for our country" and in return for the money the native chiefs of Togoland have unanimously elected the Orange Grand Secretary of Ulster as Honorary Chief and proxy for Togoland, something "never given to a White man before."

Black members of African lodges have been coming to march in Orange parades in Ireland. These trips are frequently paid for by Loyalists and lodge members in Ulster. In July 2003, John McCray, a high ranking member of the Orange Order in Portadown greeted Blacks from African lodges. It would seem that blacks and other non-Whites are welcomed by the Orange Order in Portadown but White Catholics are not. They took pride of place at the Orange parades in Market Hill and the Drumcree parade, they also reviewed Loyalist and Orange marching bands and were warmly greeted by order members who shook their black brothers' hands. Members of the Mohawk Indian lodges also make frequent visits.

The UTV television station aired a programme in November of 2005 called "A Day in the Life: Two Countries One Journey." It showed the journey of leading Orangeman, Drew Nelson, to Ghana in June of 2005. It proudly showed Nelson setting out to the airport for his trip to Ghana to meet the witch doctors of the African Orange Order. From the moment he arrived in Ghana he was treated like a visiting head of state by the tribesmen of the African Orange Order. All were pleased to meet him and they were pleased to talk about the Drumcree / Gravaghy road protest.

He met many members from different Lodges in Ghana and after Nelson did a tribal dance at a church service, with members of a Black Women's Orange Lodge, which he said "felt very natural" he then spoke the his assembled brothers. Tobe Subo said "Knowing that he is coming from the heart of Orangeism, that is Ulster, we know today we are all Ulstermen."

Nelson standing in front of a banner of the sodomite and pedophile William of Orange flanked by the Scottish and loyalist Ulster flags addressed the gathered Black brethren and said that his trip to the dark continent was a "... wonderful, wonderful experience for me" and that he was "touched." He wants to "set up a support organisation" so "we can help you and also you can help us ... believe me we have got things to learn from you."

Two weeks later when he arrived back in Ireland he said "The Orange Order in Northern Ireland and our members have a lot to learn from our brethren in Ghana ... I wish I could bring lots of our members out to Ghana ..."

Zionism

Members of the Orange Order and many Ulster Loyalists are known to support the cause of Zionism and the Zionist State in Palestine. Rev. Ian Paisley—who is believed by both Catholics and Protestants to be the cause of the recent troubles that has plagued Ireland for the past 45 years—is a long time leading member of the Orange Order. After the Elections of November 2003, his party—the Democratic Unionist Party—has become the biggest Loyalist / Unionist Party in Northern Ireland. Paisley and Peter Robinson, who are the leaders of the party, have both visited Israel to show their support for the Jewish state and to organize a weapons shipment with the Mossad for their terrorist group "Ulster Resistance."

Jewish writer and Broadcaster, Jon Ronson, spent some time with Paisley in Africa. In his book Them: Adventures with Extremists, he said that Paisley was "fluent in Hebrew" and Paisley said "Jerusalem has too many Arabs" and when Ronson recited the Jewish prayer, the Shema, in Hebrew, Paisley said it was "a beautiful verse." He also showed his support for interracial marriage when he said he was glad to hear that Ronson had married a Presbyterian. Paisley also has a religious mission in the Cameroon where he teaches his version of fire and brimstone to his Black brothers and sisters. He also has full time Paisleyite missionaries in Africa spreading the word of Ulster Loyalism and flying the Ulster loyalist flag over mission houses and churches. "For Dr. Paisley the occupants of the secret room were not Bilderbergers nor Jews."[6] Paisley does not believe that there is a Zionist Cabal of the New World Order; he believes it is Irish Catholics.

Billy Logan of the Royal Black Preceptory said, "I believe from ancient times the Jewish people have a right to a homeland. I fervently support Israel and we consider ourselves true friends of our Jewish neighbours."[7] Norman Richardson, secretary of the Northern Ireland Inter-Faith Forum, agreed with the Zionist Billy Logan, "Many Protestants are Christian Zionists who are members of pro-Israeli Christian groups ... Jewish communities want to be identified with the mainstream society to prove that once they were immigrants but today are no more ... This being the case, there is a general perception that the Jews are closer to the majority Protestant community," he said.

"I am a true blue Ulsterman ..." said Cyril Rosenberg. "These people are more pro-Israeli than we are," quipped Shoshana Appleton. She admitted that "... other Northern Irish Jews admit that community members feel most secure with the pro-London, or Unionist, status quo."[8] Both these quotes are from Jews living in Belfast. When Chabad-Lubavitch Rabbi Avraham Citron from Los Angeles was visiting Belfast he said he was proud to see all the Israeli flags in Loyalist areas.

Anti-Nationalism

John Findly of "LOL 221 Calton Protestant Defenders" was asked of the alleged racist links in the Orange Order said that there is "No foundation ... we have Lodges world wide including places like Ghana and Togo, we have thousands of Black members, so to have links with racist groups would defeat the purpose of the Orange Order. To hate a person for the colour of their skin ... is beyond stupid ... Racist comments or any racial discrimination is treated the same way (members thrown out) ... I have no time for politics based on racial disharmony, groups such as the BNP and WNP are trying to play on peoples base feelings and I feel any party would be more beneficial than any of these two … I have been on demonstrations such as anti-Fascist and anti-poll tax ones ..."

Paisley's Free Presbyterian Church are no friends of the "White Nationalist movement". Rev. Brian Green of the church, in part of a statement made in 1966, made his feelings clear, "the free Presbyterian church was not a group of gangsters, Fascists and Nazis and was not associated with subversive activities."[9]

In the same year he had this to say in regard to National Socialists: "We are not Fascists ... our divisions (UVF / UPV) Our men who fought for the flag against Fascism and please God they will do it again if need be."[10]

Videos

Some of the trouble police dealt with on the 12th of July 2013

Quotes

Gallery

See also

References

  1. "Satanic secrets of the Orange Order". The Observer. 24 October 1999. 
  2. Short, Martin. Inside the Brotherhood: Explosive Secrets of the Freemasons. HarperCollins, 1995. ISBN 0586070656
  3. Ibid.
  4. The Canadian Scene A Brief Historical Sketch
  5. Haddick-Flynn, Kevin. A Short History of Orangeism. Cork: Mercier Press, 2002. ISBN 1856353990
  6. Ronson, Jon. Them: Adventures with Extremists. Pan Macmillan, 2002. ISBN 0330375466
  7. Caught in the middle: Irish Jews walk fine line in sectarian conflict
  8. Ibid.
  9. Boulton, David. The UVF, 1966-73: An Anatomy of Loyalist Rebellion. Gill and Macmillan, 1973. ISBN 0717106667
  10. Ibid.
  11. Short, Martin. Inside the Brotherhood: Explosive Secrets of the Freemasons. HarperCollins, 1995. ISBN 0586070656
  12. Ibid.

External links

Part of a series of articles on
Freemasonry
Freemason
Core Articles

Freemasonry · Grand Lodge · Masonic Lodge · Masonic Lodge Officers · Grand Master · Prince Hall Freemasonry · Regular Masonic jurisdictions

History

History of Freemasonry · Liberté chérie · Masonic manuscripts

Part of this article consists of modified text from Metapedia (which sadly became a Zionist shill), page http:en.metapedia.org/wiki/Orange Order and/or Wikipedia (is liberal-bolshevistic), page http:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orange Order, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.