UK arrested Tommy Robinson for reporting child-rape gangs that the government caters to. The UK banned reporting of his arrest, denied him a lawyer, and is trying to have him assassinated in prison. Regardless of how you feel about his views, this is a totalitarian government.

Tommy Robinson isn't the first to that the UK has jailed after a secret trial. Melanie Shaw tried to expose child abuse in a Nottinghamshire kids home -- it wasn't foreigners doing the molesting, but many members of the UK's parliament. The government kidnapped her child and permanently took it away. Police from 3 forces have treated her like a terrorist and themselves broken the law. Police even constantly come by to rob her phone and money. She was tried in a case so secret the court staff had no knowledge of it. Her lawyer, like Tommy's, wasn't present. She has been held for over 2 years in Peterborough Prison. read, read

Jamaica

From en-Rightpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Jamaica
Flag of Jamaica
Flag
Coat of arms of Jamaica
Coat of arms
Location of Jamaica
Capital
and largest city
Kingston
Official languages English
National language Jamaican Patois
Ethnic groups 76.3% African descent, 15.1% Afro-European, 3.4% East Indian and Afro-East Indian, 3.2% Caucasian, 1.2% Chinese and 0.8% Other.[1][dubious ]
Demonym Jamaican
Government Parliamentary democracy and Constitutional monarchy
• Monarch
Elizabeth II
Patrick Allen
Bruce Golding
Independence
• from the United Kingdom
6 August 1962
Area
• Total
10,991 km2 (4,244 sq mi) (166th)
• Water (%)
1.5
Population
• July 2010 estimate
2,847,232 (133rd)
• Density
Template:Convinfobox/sec2 (49th)
GDP (PPP) 2010 estimate
• Total
$23.716 billion[2]
• Per capita
$8,727[2]
GDP (nominal) 2010 estimate
• Total
$13.694 billion[2]
• Per capita
$5,039[2]
Gini (2000) 37.9
medium
HDI (2010) Increase 0.688[3]
Error: Invalid HDI value · 80th
Currency Jamaican dollar (JMD)
Time zone (UTC-5)
Drives on the left
Calling code +1-876
ISO 3166 code JM
Internet TLD .jm

Jamaica is an island nation of the Greater Antilles, 234 kilometres (146 mi) in length and as much as 80 kilometres (50 mi) in width situated in the Caribbean Sea. It is about 145 kilometres (90 mi) south of Cuba, and 190 kilometres (120 mi) west of the island of Hispaniola, on which Haiti and the Dominican Republic are situated. Its indigenous Arawakan-speaking Taíno inhabitants named the island Xaymaca, meaning the "Land of Wood and Water", or the "Land of Springs".[4]

History

Formerly a Spanish possession known as Santiago, it later became the British West Indies Crown colony of Jamaica. It is best known for its vast numbers of negro slaves imported to work on the island's extensive sugar plantations, of which three better known plantation owners were Sir John Gladstone, M.P., the father of the 19th century Liberal Prime Minister, William Beckford, the famous antiquarian who built Fonthill Abbey,[5] and the Grants of Kilgraston, near Perth in Scotland.

The population today is almost universally negro, and the island is the third most populous anglophone country in the Americas, after the United States and Canada.

External links

References

  1. University of the West Indies[unreliable source?]
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 "Jamaica". International Monetary Fund. Retrieved 2011-04-21. 
  3. "Human Development Report 2010" (PDF). United Nations. 2010. Retrieved 5 November 2010. 
  4. The United Confederation of Taíno People. "Taíno Dictionary" (in Spanish). Retrieved 2007-10-18. 
  5. Gemmett, Robert J., Beckford's Fonthill, Norwich, 2003.
Unbalanced-scales.jpg
This section or article contains text from Wikipedia or Metapedia which has not yet been processed. It is thus likely to contain material which does not comply with the Rightpedia guide lines. You can help Rightpedia by editing the article and cleaning it from bias and inappropriate wordings.
Part of this article consists of modified text from Metapedia (which sadly became a Zionist shill), page http:en.metapedia.org/wiki/Jamaica and/or Wikipedia (is liberal-bolshevistic), page http:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamaica, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.