Guillotine

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The guillotine (/ˈgijətin/ or /ˈgɪlətin/)is a device used for carrying out executions by decapitation. It consists of a tall upright frame from which a heavy blade is suspended. This blade is raised with a rope and then allowed to drop, severing the victim's head from his or her body. The device is noted for long being the main method of execution in France and, more particularly, for its use during the French Revolution. The guillotine also "became a part of popular culture, celebrated as the people's avenger by supporters of the Revolution and vilified as the preeminent symbol of the Terror by opponents."[1]

Part of this article consists of modified text from Metapedia, page http:en.metapedia.org/wiki/Guillotine and/or Wikipedia, page http:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillotine, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.

References

  1. R. Po-chia Hsia, Lynn Hunt, Thomas R. Martin, Barbara H. Rosenwein, and Bonnie G. Smith, The Making of the West, Peoples and Culture, A Concise History, Volume II: Since 1340, Second Edition (New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2007), 664.