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Geert Wilders

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Geert Wilders
Wilder's wife, Krisztina, born Marfai [1]

Geert Wilders (born September 6, 1963)[2] is a Dutch zionist politician and warmonger[3]. His paternal grandmother, Johanna Meijer stems from a rich Indian-Jewish family. His grandfather, Johan Ordning was leader of Fortes Honswick, a Dutch concentration camp, where Dutch SS members were detained and tortured. Geert Wilders has repeatedly made it clear that he wants to start a war on Islam. For example, during a speach in Vienna on March 27, 2015, Geert Wilders exclamated: "Our clear message is: We will defeat Islam!"[4]

Geert Wilders has been a member of the Dutch Parliament since 1998, first for the liberalistic People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD) and, from 2006 on, with the Party for Freedom (PVV).[2] He founded PVV and is its political leader.[2][5] Wilders is known for his instigation of Islamohysteria, his voluntary isolation due to alledged threats (The "threats" are good propaganda for Wilders, because it is often suggested that they are from "militant islamists" although there is no proof for that and the possibility that Wilders' own movement is behind at least a significant number of these "threats" should not be excluded), as well as being banned from entering the United Kingdom in February 2009.[6]

In September 2012, Wilders suffered a great defeat in the national elections in the Netherlands. His party lost 9 seats (from 24 seats to 15). The reason of this defeat can be found in his collaboration with a pro-immigration coalition that followed after the previous elections. But in those elections many people had voted for Wilders because they assumed he would be against immigration.


Early life and early career

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Wilders was born in Venlo, Netherlands, in the province of Limburg. Wilders insists that he was raised a Roman Catholic[7], but in 2009 the anthropologist Lizzy van Leeuwen exposed Wilders' Jewish roots in an article in the newspaper "De Groene Amsterdammer"[8]. Wilders' Jewishness can be clearly seen from the following facts:

  1. Wilders' Jewish sympathy is rather unnatural and abnormal for a non jewish person
  2. Wilders himself has speculated that his father may have been of Jewish descent
  3. Wilders' wife is Jewish
  4. Wilders' matriarchal grandmother, Johanna Ording-Meijer, came from Indonesia (a former Dutch colony) and was of Jewish ehnicity[9]. Geert Wilders, although a quarter Jewish, would be considered a full Jew under rabbinical law.

He received his secondary education at the Mavo and Havo of the "R.K. St. Thomas College" in Venlo.[2] He followed a health insurance course at the "Stichting Opleiding Sociale Verzekeringen" in Amsterdam and gained several Law certificates at the Dutch Open University.[2]

Wilders' father was a manager for the printing and copying manufacturing company Océ.[2] His father had moved from Germany to the Netherlands during the National Socialist period.[10] Wilders speculates that his father may have had some Jewish ancestry.[10]

Wilders' considered his lifetime goal after his college graduation to be to see the world.[10] Wilders initially worked in the health insurance industry.[7][10] His interest in the subject led him into politics as a speech-writer for VVD.[7][10] He started his formal political career as a parliamentary assistant to Frits Bolkestein from 1990 to 1998, in that time keeping up a heavy travel schedule. He traveled all across the middle east in the 1990s, especially to Israel (where he has "friends" and where he has even lived for a prolonged period), but he has also made brief visits to Iran, Syria, Jordan, and Egypt[10].

Wilders was elected for the VVD to the municipal council of Utrecht, the fourth largest city of the Netherlands, in 1997.[7] He represented his hometown, Kanaleneiland. A year later, he was elected to the national parliament.[7] His first four years in parliament drew little attention. In 2002, his appointment as a public spokesman for the VVD led Wilders to become more well known for his Islamohysteria.

Political career

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Geert Wilders

In September 2004, Wilders left the VVD, having been a member since 1989, to form his own political party, Groep Wilders, later renamed Partij voor de Vrijheid (Party for Freedom or PVV).[11] He left the liberal party over a dispute within the VVD in late August 2004 about, among other things, his refusal to endorse the party's position that EU-accession negotiations must be started with Turkey.[7]

The PVV's political platform often overlap those of the murdered Rotterdam politician Pim Fortuyn and his List Pim Fortuyn.[7] The PVV bases its ideas on a small government, law and order, and direct democracy ideological framework.[12] It calls for a 16 billion tax reduction, a far stricter policy toward recreational drug use, investing more in roads and other infrastructure, building nuclear power plants, and putting animal rights into the Dutch constitution.[12]

In 2007, Dutch newspaper NRC Handelsblad discovered that Wilders has set up a management structure of the PVV whereby only Wilders himself is a party member[13]; the party has no other members, and is governed by the two legal bodies, the Vereniging Groep Wilders, and a "stichting" or limited company. Both legal bodies have Wilders as their only board member. This is highly uncommon in the Netherlands, where political parties allow membership to members of the public, and the PVV's 2006 electoral win marked the first time in Dutch history a political party entered parliament despite having no members.[14]

On international issues, the PVV opposes further expansion of the European Union, opposes the European constitution, and supports a more expansive Dutch involvement with NATO in the war on terrorism.[12] On crime issues, Wilders advocates a U.S.-style three strikes law with mandatory life sentences after three separate acts of violent crime.[15] In recent interviews, Wilders more than once indicated that the Dutch constitution and European Convention on Human Rights should be amended or temporarily suspended to protect citizens from Islamic extremism.[15] He also supports stripping criminals with dual nationality of their Dutch citizenship and deporting them to their country of origin.[15] In November 2006, PVV won, in its first parliamentary election, 9 of the 150 open seats.[16]

In response to the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy, Wilders posted the cartoons on his website on 1 February 2006, in support of the Danish cartoonists and freedom of speech. Following his publication, Wilders stated he had received more than 40 death threats in just two days.[17] Wilders said that he "cannot stand" the fact that "Europe is weak; Europe is full of cowards" and posted them to express support for "freedom of expression".[15]

The Dutch newspaper Telegraaf reported in May 2007 that Geert Wilders had been shadowed by the Dutch General Intelligence and Security Service for years, when he was foreign affairs spokesman for the VVD.[18] During that time, Wilders had been regularly meeting officials at the Israeli Embassy in The Hague.[18] Sources in the security service said that the agency was surveilling conversations between Wilders and Israeli personnel.[19] The security services denied the allegations, insisting it had never shadowed or eavesdropped on Wilders.[20]

On 15 December 2007, Wilders was declared "politician of the year" by NOS-radio, a mainstream Dutch radio station.[21] The parliamentary press praised his ability to dominate political discussion and to attract the debate and to get into publicity with his well-timed one-liners.[21] The editors eventually gave the title to Wilders because he was the only one who scored high both among the press as well as the general public.[22][23]

In response to Wilders' outspoken statements, a countermovement was organized in December 2007 with the stated aim to "stop evil".[24] FrontPage Magazine has named Wilders the "Man of the Year" for 2008.[25]

Personal life

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Despite his Catholic upbringing, Wilders is religiously lapsed, and he does not even celebrate religious holidays such as Easter Sunday.[7] He is married to Krisztina Marfai, a Jewess from Hungary [26] with whom he can only meet about once every week due to alleged security concerns.[10]

Wilders grandfather, Ording, is reported to have been leader in the rank of major at the post-war camp Fort Honswijk and was known there as a sadistic camp guard [26].

Political views

Political principles

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Wilders generally considers himself to be a libertarian, with a specific mix of positions independent of the European political spectrum and particular of iconoclastic Dutch society. He has stated that "My allies are not Le Pen or Haider... We'll never join up with the fascists and Mussolinis of Italy. I'm very afraid of being linked with the wrong rightist fascist groups." Wilders views British Prime Minster Margaret Thatcher to be his greatest political role model. As stated before, VVD figure Frits Bolkestein also heavily influenced his beliefs.[7]

Wilders strongly opposes the Dutch political system in general. He believes that a ruling elite exists among parliamentarians who only care about their own personal careers and disregard the will of the people. He also blames the Dutch system of multi-party coalition governing for a lack of clear and effective policies. In his view, Dutch society advocates rule by consensus and cultural relativism, while he believes that it should change so as to "not tolerate the intolerant".[15]

Wilders published his political manifesto in March 2005.[11][27] It received a mixed reception in public polls, with 53% calling it "implausible" and 47% more supportive.[27] Some of its key points included:

Wilders also instigates hate against East Europeans, especially against Poles[28].

Views on Israel

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Geert Wilders

In the past twenty five years Geert Wilders has visited Israel on numerous occasions,[29] where he says he has met Ariel Sharon and Ehud Olmert personally. [29]

At one point, Wilders wanted to move to the State of Israel because he believed one could, as opposed to the Netherlands, 'work for your own money'.[29] Wilders worked in bread factories and a moshav.[30] With the money he earned, he traveled through Israel and some nearby countries. In 2003, Wilders stated: "The past years I have visited many interesting countries, from Tunisia to Turkey and from Cyprus to Iran, but nowhere I have that special feeling of solidarity that I always get if I set foot on the Israeli Ben Gurion Airport."[29]

Wilders has, in the eight years he has served in the Dutch Parliament, largely supported Israel and has criticised countries he perceives as enemies of Israel.[29] Furthermore, Wilders has made some proposals in the Dutch Parliament inspired by Israel. For example, Wilders supports implementing Israel's administrative detention in the Netherlands, a practice heavily criticized by human rights groups, which he calls "common sense".[15]

Geert Wilders is a well-known Zionist who weekly visits the Israeli embassy and often visits Israel.

Views on Islam

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Wilders is best known for his criticism of Islam, summing up his views as being that "I don't hate Muslims. I hate Islam." Although identifying Islamic extremists as a small 5-15% minority of Muslims,[15] he argues that "there is no such thing as 'moderate Islam'" and that the "Koran also states that Muslims who believe in only part of the Koran are in fact apostates".[31] He suggests that Muslims should “tear out half of the Koran if they wished to stay in the Netherlands” because it contains 'terrible things' and that Muhammad would “in these days be hunted down as a terrorist[32]. On 8 August 2007, Wilders opined in a open letter[33] to the Dutch newspaper De Volkskrant that the Koran, which he called a "fascist book", should be outlawed in the Netherlands, like Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf.[34] He has stated that "The book incites hatred and killing and therefore has no place in our legal order."[35] He has also referred to Mohammed as "the devil".[30]

He believes that all Muslim immigration to the Netherlands should be halted and all settled immigrants should be paid to leave.Referring to the increased population of Muslims in the Netherlands, he has said that:

In a speech before the Dutch Parliament, he stated that:

Due to this position on Islam, the Dutch-Morrocan rapper Appa, when interviewed about Wilders for a newspaper, said “if someone were to put a bullet in his head, I wouldn't mind”.[37] Wilder's intolerance of Islamic influence prompted the Muslim Mayor of Rotterdam Ahmed Aboutaleb to severely reprimand him.[38]

Nonetheless, Wilders has traveled widely in the Arab world and Der Spiegel has stated that Wilders will "wax poetic" over those "magnificent countries".[10] Wilders has also said that "It's a real shame that these places are so chaotic."[10] As well, Wilders has stated that he supports the free speech rights of his critics, saying that "An Imam who wants a politician dead is - however reprehensible - allowed to say so".[27]

Publications

Fitna (movie)

"Fitna" is the title of a short misleading movie produced by Geert Wilders in 2008. This movie attempts to depict the Muslims as terrorists and murderers by showing acts of terrorism together with out-of-context quotes from the Koran. The movie also tries to create a fear of Muslims by showing images of the rise of the Islam in the Netherlands. The movie, however, completely ignores the fact that Muslims did not change the immigration policy of the Netherlands, which is the real underlying cause of the immigration problems.

The title of the movie comes from the Arabic word "fitna", which describes "disagreement and division among people" or a "test of faith in times of trial".

Marked for death (book)

Wilders' book.

In 2012, Wilders published a book entitled "Marked for Death" in which he unsuccesfully tries to depict himself as a person prosecuted for his views. The book is also full of Zionist instigated Islamohysteria. It was published in the English language and not in the Dutch language, so the book was presumably written for the Jewish and zionist supporters of Wilders in the U.S.A. and not for the Dutch people, the potential voters for Wilders' party. This shows that Wilders will place the zionist interests above the national interests of the Netherlands.

Criticism

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Wilders is a very controversial figure in the Netherlands,[39][10] and around the world.[40][41] He has been often labelled in the world news media as "extreme right"[42][43] and "far right".[44][45][46][47][30][48][49][50] Critics argue that Wilders' views come from racism[15][51][52] and Islamophobia.[53][54]

News agencies such as The Guardian, The Irish Times, and BBC News have stated that Wilders primarily built his popularity on the fear and resentment among Dutch voters towards immigrants.[55][56][57] Der Spiegel has called his statements "disrespectful", "hate-filled tirades" and has stated that "the elite in the Netherlands despise him for his demagogic manner".[10] The Times has called him "self-evidently preposterous".[6] According to NRC Handelsblad, "his critics say he has become obsessed with Islam and impervious to reason and alternative points of view."

Given that Wilders has allegedly called for the banning of Islamic books while simultaneously arguing for his own personal freedom of speech, editorials in The Montreal Gazette, The Guardian, and The New York Times have accused him of hypocrisy.[58][42][59] In a speech during a Dutch parliamentary debate, Wilders elaborated that he calls for the consistent application of Dutch laws restricting free speech that incites violence.[31] He would, ideally, prefer to see nearly all such laws abolished.[27][60] Also, socialist anti-Wilders activists have alleged that Dutch police arrested them for "insulting a parliamentarian" in their protests, which they also regard as hypocrisy.[53]

Ban on entering the UK

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Lord Pearson of Rannoch and Baroness Cox of Queensbury, right-wing peers of the House of Lords (the upper chamber of the British Parliament), invited Wilders to a February 12, 2009 showing of Fitna in the Palace of Westminster.[61] Two days before the showing, the Home Secretary, Jacqui Smith, banned Wilders from entering the territory of the United Kingdom, labelling him an "undesirable person".[62] A Home Office spokesperson elaborated that "The Government opposes extremism in all its forms... and that was the driving force behind tighter rules on exclusions for unacceptable behaviour that the Home Secretary announced in October last year."[45]

Wilders defied the ban and entered via Heathrow airport on the 12th, accompanied by TV crews.[6] He was quickly detained by UK Border Patrol officials and sent back on one of the next flights to the Netherlands.[6] He called Prime Minister Gordon Brown "the biggest coward in Europe" and remarked that "Of course I will come back."[6] Wilders had visited the United Kingdom in December 2008, without any issues.[48] Lord Pearson did not support Wilders' decision to defy the government.[45] In response to the ban, both Pearson and Cox accused the government of "appeasing" militant Islam.[61]

The International Herald Tribune has stated that the ban was broadly condemned in the British news media.[6] The Dutch Foreign Secretary, Maxime Verhagen, called the decision "highly regrettable” and complained to his British counterpart.[45] Dutch Prime Minister Jan Peter Balkenende complained to Gordon Brown about the "disappointing" decision.[63] The Quilliam Foundation, a British think tank, criticized the ban,[59] as did National Secular Society president Terry Sanderson.[48] The Labour peer Lord Ahmed expressed support;[59] the Muslim Council of Britain also did so, labeling Wilders "an open and relentless preacher of hate".[48]

Attempts at prosecution

Cases

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Fitna and anti-Islamic comments made by Wilders both prompted agencies such as the Dutch anti-discrimination group The Netherlands Shows Its Colors to take legal action.[40] On 15 August 2007, a representative of the Prosecutors' Office in Amsterdam declared that "dozens of reports" against Wilders had been filed, and that they were all being considered.[64] Attempts to prosecute Wilders under Dutch anti-hate speech laws in June 2008 failed, with the public prosecutor's office stating that Wilders' comments contributed to the debate on Islam in Dutch society and also had been made outside parliament.[57][40] The office released a statement reading: “That comments are hurtful and offensive for a large number of Muslims does not mean that they are punishable. Freedom of expression fulfils an essential role in public debate in a democratic society. That means that offensive comments can be made in a political debate.”[40][65]

On 21 January 2009, a three judge court ordered prosecutors to try him.[57][65] Their statement argued that "In a democratic system, hate speech is considered so serious that it is in the general interest to... draw a clear line" and that "The court also considers appropriate criminal prosecution for insulting Muslim worshippers because of comparisons between Islam and Nazism made by Wilders".[57][65] If convicted, he may get 16 months of jail time and a fine of 9866.67 euros, which works out to around $12,800.[66] His lawyer, Bram Moszkowicz, plans to take the case to the Supreme Court.[67]

Responses

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The prosecution created, in the words of Haaretz, "a high-profile affair".[68] Wilders labeled the judgement an "attack on the freedom of expression".[57] The prosecution was condemned by editorials in Wall Street Journal,[39] Investors Business Daily,[69] The Washington Times,[70] The American Spectator,[71] Forbes,[66] Dallas Morning News,[72] City Journal,[41] Montreal Gazette,[42] The Jerusalem Post,[73] Canada.com,[51] and The Australian.[47] New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg criticized it in front of the Mayor of Amsterdam and the Dutch Ambassador to the United States.[51] Wilders' right-wing rival VVD called the case "alarming".[46]

The center-left Labour party welcomed the court's ruling.[46] The Socialist Party did as well.[74] The Muslims and Government Consultative Body, said that "We are positive that this will contribute to a more respectful tone to the public debate."[46] Abdelmajid Khairoun, Dutch Muslim Council chairperson, expressed support, stating that "Muslim youngsters who make anti-semitic remarks are prosecuted but Wilders' anti-Islamic remarks go unpunished".[74] The New York Times ran a supportive op-ed arguing that "for a man who calls for a ban on the Koran to act as the champion of free speech is a bit rich".[58]

A survey by Angus Reid Global Monitor has found that public opinion is deeply split on the prosecution, with 50% supporting Wilders and 43% opposed.[65] However, public support for PVV has vastly increased since Wilders' legal troubles began, with PVV virtually tied with VVD to be the third most popular party.[75][55] According to Radio Netherlands, "Dutch politicians themselves seem to be keeping quiet on the issue; they are probably worried that media attention will only serve to make the controversial politician more popular."[39]


Part of this article consists of modified text from Wikipedia, page http:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geert Wilders, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.


References

  1. Geert Wilders' letter to Rabbi Cooper
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 "G. Wilders - Parlement & Politiek". Parlement.com (in Dutch). Retrieved 2008-03-24. 
  3. Wilders' political party, PVV, has repeatedly advocated a "preventive" war against Iran.
  4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wa0XFeN-SY&feature=youtu.be at time 5:27
  5. Dohmen, Joep: Alleen Wilders lid PVV. In: NRC Handelsblad, 21 April 2007 (in Dutch). Retrieved on 14-02-2009.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 Britain deports Dutch 'provocateur'. By John F. Burns. International Herald Tribune. Published February 12, 2009.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 Profile: Geert Wilders. By Paul Kirby . BBC News. Published 27 March 2008.
  8. http://www.groene.nl/2009/36/wreker-van-zijn-indische-grootouders
  9. http://www.groene.nl/2009/36/wreker-van-zijn-indische-grootouders
  10. 10.00 10.01 10.02 10.03 10.04 10.05 10.06 10.07 10.08 10.09 10.10 A Missionary with Dark Visions. By Gerald Traufette. Der Spiegel. Published March 27, 2008.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 "Geert Wilders Fitna Movie Timeline". FeceOnAir.com. Retrieved 2008-03-08. 
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 Election Pamphlet. Party for Freedom. Accessed February 12, 2009.
  13. Dohmen, 2007, ibid.,
  14. Dohmen, 2007, ibid.,
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 15.3 15.4 15.5 15.6 15.7 Sackur, Steven (2006-03-22). "Geert Wilders". HARDtalk. Retrieved 2008-03-30. 
  16. PVV. Dutch News. Accessed 12 February 2009.
  17. Wilders gets death threats over caricatures. Expatica.com Published 6 February 2006.
  18. 18.0 18.1 "AIVD had Wilders in vizier". De Telegraaf (in Dutch). 2007-05-09. Retrieved 2008-03-24. 
  19. "AIVD schaduwde Wilders bij bezoeken ambassade". Elsevier (in Dutch). 2007-05-09. Retrieved 2008-03-24. 
  20. "AIVD ontkent schaduwen Wilders". Elsevier. 2007-05-09. Retrieved 2008-03-24. 
  21. 21.0 21.1 "Wilders politicus van 2007". NOS Journaal (in Dutch). 2007-12-14. Retrieved 2008-03-24. 
  22. "Wilders uitgeroepen tot winnaar in NOS-peiling". nu.nl (in Dutch). 2007-12-15. Retrieved 2008-03-24. 
  23. Steen, Michael (2007-12-27). "Anti-Islamic outsider is top Dutch politician". Financial Times. Retrieved 2008-03-24. 
  24. Schaafsma, Jouke (2007-12-02). "Verzetsbeweging against Wilders". De Telegraaf (in Dutch). Retrieved 2008-03-24. 
  25. Man of the Year: Geert Wilders. FrontPage Magazine. Published January 2, 2009.
  26. 26.0 26.1 http://www.nvu.info/scholing1.html
  27. 27.0 27.1 27.2 27.3 27.4 Dutch Divided on Wilders Agenda. NIS - News Bulletin. Published March 15, 2005.
  28. https://www.rnw.org/archive/polish-wilders-hates-poles
  29. 29.0 29.1 29.2 29.3 29.4 "Verliefd op Israël". Volkskrant (in Dutch). 2007-04-10. Retrieved 2008-03-24. 
  30. 30.0 30.1 30.2 Liphshiz, Cnaan (2008-01-11). "Far-right Dutch politician brings his anti-Islam rhetoric back to Jerusalem". Haaretz. Retrieved 2008-03-24. 
  31. 31.0 31.1 31.2 Mr Wilders' contribution to the parliamentary debate on Islamic activism. Party For Freedom. Transcript Published September 6, 2007.
  32. Waterfield, Bruno (2007-08-14). "Ban Koran like Mein Kampf, says Dutch MP". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 2008-03-24. 
  33. Wilders, Geert (2007-08-08). "Genoeg is genoeg: verbied de Koran" (in Dutch). De Volkskrant. Retrieved 2008-03-24. 
  34. "Wilders: verbied de Koran, ook in moskee" (in Dutch). De Volkskrant. 2007-08-08. Retrieved 2007-08-08. 
  35. den Boer, Nicolien (2007-01-08). "'Qur'an should be banned' - Wilders strikes again". Radio Netherlands. Retrieved 2008-03-24. 
  36. "Wilders: get rid of half of Koran!". Expatica. Internet Archive. 2007-02-13. Retrieved 2008-03-24. 
  37. Goodenough, Patrick (2007-11-16). "Dutch Reject Call to Ban Koran But Worry About Islam". Cybercast News Service. Retrieved 2008-03-24. 
  38. Aboutaleb: Wilders groot door Moslims
  39. 39.0 39.1 39.2 Worldwide reactions to Wilders' prosecution. By Nicola Chadwick. Radio Netherlands. Published 22 January 2009.
  40. 40.0 40.1 40.2 40.3 Holland declines to prosecute anti-Islam politician. International Herald Tribune. Published June 30, 2008.
  41. 41.0 41.1 Submission in the Netherlands. By Bruce Bawer. City Journal. Published 22 January 2009.
  42. 42.0 42.1 42.2 Dutch courts embark on a slippery slope. Montreal Gazette. Published January 23, 2009.
  43. Dutch extreme-right MP calls for Koran ban. European Jewish Press. Published August 8, 2007.
  44. Dutch MP to be tried for views on Islam. By Vanessa Mock. The Independent. Published 22 January 2009.
  45. 45.0 45.1 45.2 45.3 Far-right Dutch MP Geert Wilders vows to defy UK ban. By Emily Gosden. Times Online. Posted February 11, 2009.
  46. 46.0 46.1 46.2 46.3 Dutch MP faces trial over anti-Islam film. By Mariette Le Roux. Agence France-Presse. Published January 22, 2009.
  47. 47.0 47.1 Caving in to Islamists. By Janet Albrechtsen. The Australian. Published January 28, 2009.
  48. 48.0 48.1 48.2 48.3 Far-right Dutch MP refused entry to UK. The Guardian. Published 12 February 2009.
  49. Far-Right MP Refused Entry By UK. Sky News. Published 12 February 2009.
  50. Far-right Dutch politician Wilders held at Heathrow. The Metro. Published 12 February 2009.
  51. 51.0 51.1 51.2 Jailed politicians, dead artists & pot. By Walker Morrow. Canada.com Published February 6, 2009.
  52. ABC's Nick Watt Smears Dutch Filmmaker as Racist. By Scott Whitlock. Newsbusters. Published April 3, 2008.
  53. 53.0 53.1 Geert Wilders' Fitna: Islamophobia on film. Socialist Worker Online. Published 8 April 2008.
  54. Geert gone wild. By Moushumi Khan. Al-arabiya. Published 29 April 2008.
  55. 55.0 55.1 Prosecution of Dutch populist will provide a judicial soap opera. By Isabel Conway. The Irish Times. Published February 11, 2009.
  56. Dutch court says anti-Islam MP must face race hatred prosecution. The Guardian. Published 21 January 2009.
  57. 57.0 57.1 57.2 57.3 57.4 Islam film Dutch MP to be charged. BBC News. Published 21 January 2009.
  58. 58.0 58.1 Totally Tolerant, Up to a Point. By Ian Burma. The New York Times. Published January 29, 2009.
  59. 59.0 59.1 59.2 Wilders' ban is in Britain's best interests. By Nazir Ahmed. The Guardian. Published 13 February 2009.
  60. Mr Wilders writing in the Danish Newspaper Jyllands-Posten Published February 4, 2009.
  61. 61.0 61.1 The Daily Telegraph, "Dutch MP Geert Wilders deported after flying to Britain to show anti-Islamic film", 12 February 2009.
  62. Dutch party chief barred from UK. Financial Times. Published February 11, 2009.
  63. PM lodges protest over UK's MP ban. Radio Netherlands. Published 13 February 2009.
  64. "Aangiftes tegen Wilders stromen binnen" (in Dutch). Elsevier. 2007-11-15. Retrieved 2008-03-24. 
  65. 65.0 65.1 65.2 65.3 Dutch React to Prosecution of Wilders. Angus Reid Global Monitor. Published February 03, 2009.
  66. 66.0 66.1 Holland Puts Offensiveness On Trial. By Diederik van Hoogstraten. Forbes. Published 26 January 2009.
  67. Top lawyer to defend Dutch anti-Islam MP Wilders. By Rob Kievit. Radio Netherlands. Published 3 February 2009.
  68. Dutch MP behind film on radical Islam: Decision to prosecute me is political. Haaretz. Published January 23, 2001.
  69. Hate-Free Speech. Investors Business Daily. Published 22 January 2009.
  70. The cost of criticizing jihadists. By Nat Hentoff. The Washington Times. Published February 9, 2009.
  71. Death to Free Speech in the Netherlands. By Brooke M. Goldstein and Aaron Meyer. The American Spectator. Published 22 January 2009.
  72. Geert Wilders and the Netherlands' shame. By Rod Dreher. Dallas Morning News. Published January 22, 2009.
  73. Our World: Defending freedom's defenders. By Caroline Glick. The Jerusalem Post. Published January 26, 2009.
  74. 74.0 74.1 Mixed reactions to Wilders court decision. Dutch News. Published 21 January 2009.
  75. Uproar for PVV. (in Dutch) Published January 25, 2009.