UK arrested Tommy Robinson for reporting child-rape gangs that the government caters to. The UK banned reporting of his arrest, denied him a lawyer, and is trying to have him assassinated in prison. Regardless of how you feel about his views, this is a totalitarian government.

Tommy Robinson isn't the first to that the UK has jailed after a secret trial. Melanie Shaw tried to expose child abuse in a Nottinghamshire kids home -- it wasn't foreigners doing the molesting, but many members of the UK's parliament. The government kidnapped her child and permanently took it away. Police from 3 forces have treated her like a terrorist and themselves broken the law. Police even constantly come by to rob her phone and money. She was tried in a case so secret the court staff had no knowledge of it. Her lawyer, like Tommy's, wasn't present. She has been held for over 2 years in Peterborough Prison. read, read

Ernst Bloch

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Ernst Bloch
Bundesarchiv Bild 183-27348-0008, Berlin, Ernst Bloch auf Begegnung der Geistesschaffenden.jpg
Ernst Bloch (1954)
Born July 8, 1885
Ludwigshafen, Germany
Died August 4, 1977(1977-08-04) (aged 92)
Tübingen, Germany
Era 20th-century philosophy
Region Western Philosophy
School Marxism
Main interests
Utopianism, revolutionary ideology, liberation theology

Ernst Bloch (German pronunciation: [ˈɛʁnst ˈblɔx], July 8, 1885 – August 4, 1977) was a German Marxist philosopher.

Bloch was influenced by both Hegel and Marx and, as he always confessed, by novelist Karl May. He was also interested in music (notably Gustav Mahler) and art (notably expressionism). He established friendships with Georg Lukács, Bertolt Brecht, Kurt Weill and Theodor W. Adorno. Bloch's work focuses on the concept that in a utopian humanistic world where oppression and exploitation have been eliminated there will always be a truly ideological revolutionary force.

Life

Bloch was born in Ludwigshafen, the son of an assimilated Jewish railway-employee. After studying philosophy, he married Else von Stritzky, daughter of a Baltic brewer in 1913, who died in 1921. His second marriage with Linda Oppenheimer lasted only a few years. His third wife was Karola Piotrowska, a Polish architect, whom he married in 1934 in Vienna. When the Nazis came to power, they had to flee, first into Switzerland, then to Austria, France, Czechoslovakia, and finally the USA. Bloch returned to the GDR in 1949 and obtained a chair in philosophy at Leipzig. When the Berlin Wall was built in 1961, he did not return to the GDR, but went to Tübingen in West Germany, where he received an honorary chair in Philosophy. He died in Tübingen.

Work

Endlose Treppe by Max Bill, which is dedicated to the Principle of Hope by Bloch.

Bloch's work became very influential in the course of the student protest movements in 1968 and in liberation theology. It is cited as a key influence by Jürgen Moltmann in his Theology of Hope (1967, Harper and Row, New York), and by Ernesto Balducci.

Bloch's Principle of Hope was written during his emigration in the USA, where he lived briefly in New Hampshire before settling in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He wrote the lengthy three volume work in the reading room of Harvard's Widener Library. Bloch originally planned to publish it there under the title Dreams of a Better Life. The Principle of Hope tries to provide an encyclopedic account of mankind's and nature's orientation towards a socially and technologically improved future.

Bibliography

Books

  • Geist der Utopie (1918) (The Spirit of Utopia, Stanford, 2000)
  • Thomas Müntzer als Theologe der Revolution (1921) (Thomas Müntzer as Theologian of Revolution)
  • Spuren (1930) (Traces, Stanford University Press, 2006)
  • Erbschaft dieser Zeit (1935) (Bequest of This Time)
  • Freiheit und Ordnung (1947) (Freedom and Order)
  • Subjekt-Objekt (1949)
  • Christian Thomasius (1949)
  • Avicenna und die aristotelische Linke (1949) (Avicenna and the aristotelian Left)
  • Das Prinzip Hoffnung (3 vols.: 1938–1947) (The Principle of Hope, MIT Press, 1986)
  • Naturrecht und menschliche Würde (1961) (Natural Law and Human Dignity, MIT Press 1986)
  • Tübinger Einleitung in die Philosophie (1963) (The Tübingen Introduction in Philosophy)
  • Religion im Erbe (1959–66) (trans.: Man on His Own, Herder and Herder, 1970)
  • Atheismus im Christentum (1968) (trans.: Atheism in Christianity, 1972)
  • Politische Messungen, Pestzeit, Vormärz (1970) (Political Measurements, the Plague, Pre-March)
  • Das Materialismusproblem, seine Geschichte und Substanz (1972) (The Problem of Materialism, Its History and Substance)
  • Experimentum Mundi. Frage, Kategorien des Herausbringens, Praxis (1975) (Experimentum Mundi. Question, Categories of Realization, Praxis)

Articles

  • “Causality and Finality as Active, Objectifying Categories:Categories of Transmission”. TELOS 21 (Fall 1974). New York: Telos Press

Further reading

  • Adorno, Theodor W. (1991). "Ernst Bloch's Spuren," Notes to Literature, Volume One, New York, Columbia University Press
  • Geoghegan, Vincent (1996). Ernst Bloch, London, Routledge
  • Hudson, Wayne (1982). The Marxist philosophy of Ernst Bloch, New York, St. Martin's Press
  • Schmidt, Burghard (1985) Ernst Bloch, Stuttgart, Metzler
  • Münster, Arno (1989). Ernst Bloch: messianisme et utopie, PUF, Paris
  • Jones, John Miller (c1995). Assembling (post)modernism : the utopian philosophy of Ernst Bloch, New York, P Lang. (Studies in European thought, v.11)
  • Korstvedt, Benjamin M. (2010). Listening for utopia in Ernst Bloch’s musical philosophy, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press
  • West, Thomas H. (1991). Ultimate hope without God : the atheistic eschatology of Ernst Bloch, New York, P. Lang (American university studies series 7 theology religion ; vol 97)

See also

External links

Part of this article consists of modified text from Metapedia (which sadly became a Zionist shill), page http:en.metapedia.org/wiki/Ernst Bloch and/or Wikipedia (is liberal-bolshevistic), page http:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernst Bloch, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.