UK arrested Tommy Robinson for reporting child-rape gangs that the government caters to. The UK banned reporting of his arrest, denied him a lawyer, and is trying to have him assassinated in prison. Regardless of how you feel about his views, this is a totalitarian government.

Tommy Robinson isn't the first to that the UK has jailed after a secret trial. Melanie Shaw tried to expose child abuse in a Nottinghamshire kids home -- it wasn't foreigners doing the molesting, but many members of the UK's parliament. The government kidnapped her child and permanently took it away. Police from 3 forces have treated her like a terrorist and themselves broken the law. Police even constantly come by to rob her phone and money. She was tried in a case so secret the court staff had no knowledge of it. Her lawyer, like Tommy's, wasn't present. She has been held for over 2 years in Peterborough Prison. read, read

Demographics of Indonesia

From en-Rightpedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The population of Indonesia according to the 2010 national census is 237.6 million,[1][2] with 58% living on the island of Java,[1] the world's most populous island.[3]

Despite a fairly effective family planning program that has been in place since the 1967,[4] Indonesia's population is projected to surpass USA and become the biggest after China and India by 2043. For the decade ending in 2010, Indonesia's population growth was 1.49 percent. Some say family planning should be revitalized based on the 1967 program to avoid Indonesia becoming the world's third most populous country, but this aim has faced a hurdle of religiously-based opinion that to follow family planning is equivalent to not being grateful to God.[5]

Indonesia includes numerous ethnic, cultural and linguistic groups, some of which are related to each other. Since independence, Indonesian (a form of Malay and official national language) is the language of most written communication, education, government, and business. Many local ethnic languages are the first language of most Indonesians and still important.

Largest cities

Largest cities of Indonesia[6]

Jktskyline.jpg
Jakarta
Sbyskyline.jpg
Surabaya

Rank City Province Population

Bandung Pasupati Skyline.jpg
Bandung
Mdnskyline.jpg
Medan
Mksskyline.jpg
Makassar

1 Jakarta Special Capital Territory of Jakarta 9,588,198
2 Surabaya East Java 2,765,487
3 Bandung West Java 2,394,873
4 Medan North Sumatra 2,097,610
5 Makassar South Sulawesi 1,738,570
6 Palembang South Sumatra 1,455,284
7 Semarang Central Java 1,338,663
8 Padang West Sumatra 1,290,322
9 Yogyakarta Special Region of Yogyakarta 950,334
10 Surakarta Central Java 944,285
11 Bogor West Java 897,767
12 Denpasar Bali 820,243

Ethnic groups

Ethnic groups Percentage
Javanese
  
40.71%
Sundanese
  
13.41%
Minangkabau
  
5.72%
Madurese
  
5.37%
Malay
  
3.45%
Betawi
  
2.51%
Bantenese
  
2.05%
Batak
  
2.02%
Banjarese
  
1.74%
Balinese
  
1.51%
Makassarese
  
0.99%
Cirebonede
  
0.94%

There are over 300 ethnic groups in Indonesia. 95% of those are of Native Indonesian ancestry. Javanese is the biggest one with 84 million people (40%), followed by Sundanese who amount to nearly 31 million (13%).

Languages

Indonesian is the official language but there are many different languages native to Indonesia. According to Ethnologue, there are currently 737 living languages,[7] the most widely spoken being Javanese.

A number of Chinese dialects, most prominently Min Nan, are also spoken. The public use of Chinese, especially Chinese characters, was officially discouraged between 1966 and 1998.

Literacy

definition: age 15 and over and can read and write
total population: 92.81%
male: 95.5%
female: 90.4% (2011 est.)

Education is not free; however, it is compulsory for children through to grade 9. Although about 92% of eligible children are enrolled in primary school, a much smaller percentage attends full-time. About 44% of secondary school-age children attend junior high school, and some others of this age group attend vocational schools.

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Central Bureau of Statistics: Census 2010, retrieved 17 January 2011 (in Indonesian)
  2. "Indonesia Book Fair focuses on Spiritual Books", Assist News Service, 2013-11-14, retrieved 2013-11-23 
  3. Calder, Joshua (3 May 2006). "Most Populous Islands". World Island Information. Retrieved 2006-09-26. 
  4. Witton, Patrick (2003). Indonesia. Melbourne: Lonely Planet. p. 47. ISBN 1-74059-154-2. 
  5. "Indonesia Facing Populace Larger Than US Revives Birth Control". January 28, 2014. 
  6. of cities, Malaysia (2010)|publisher=Department of Statistics, Malaysia
  7. ethnologue.com

External links

Part of this article consists of modified text from Wikipedia, page http:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics of Indonesia, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.