Sedevacantism

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Sede vacante.

Sedevacantism is a position espoused by some traditional Catholics who believe the Novus Ordo Church to be a completely non-Catholic modernist church, officially brought into being at the Second Vatican Council and the leaders of that sect to be imposter Anti-Popes, leaving the "seat of St. Peter" (regarded by Catholics as the first Bishop of Rome) vacant at the present time. Most proponents of the position regard the current Anti-Papacy (there have been others in history) to have been in place since 1958 until the present time, however, a minority of Catholics associated with Sedevacantism regard Angelo Roncalli as a real Pope.

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No convincing counterpoint?

The critics of Sedevacantism are very much like the critics of so-called "anti-semitism". It is just that it is considered socially beyond the pale to accept the uncomfortable truth on this matter, a line many are unwilling to cross because of the implications that it has for the forces of good and evil in the world. The best non-Sedevacantist "traditionalists" can do, in the face of overwhelming evidence, is to admit the so-called Popes (from Angelo Roncalli to the present Jorge Mario Bergoglio) are material heretics, rather than formal (manifest) heretics[1][2] and thus claim they are on the so-called "throne of St. Peter".

Even righteous traditionalists such as Bishop Richard Williamson and some other members of the SSPX, who nominally accept the Vatican II Anti-Popes as heads of the Catholic Church are unable to produce a convincing argument against sedevacantist claims. Indeed Bishop Williamson objectively lost the debate when the subject was discussed with Fr. Anthony Cekeda,[3] one of the most erudite defenders of the thesis. The only way for the Sedevacantist thesis to be untrue is if the religion of Catholicism itself is untrue.

Other cases

The Orthodox Church also adhere to their own species of Sedevacantism in regards to the See of Rome, in that they regard the position of Patriarch of Rome and All the West to have been one of the members of the pentarchy which formed the Church until the Great Schism in 1054. Since that time, the Orthodox have not set up a rival Greek Patriarch for the See of Rome, but regard the Ecumencial Patriarch of Constantinople, the New Rome, to now have the position of precedence once held by Old Rome until the schism.

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