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Black liberation theology

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Black liberation theology is an interpretation of religious scriptures which claims people of African descent have a greater understanding of the Bible because of their sufferings in the past.[1]

The modern American origins of contemporary black liberation theology can be traced to July 31, 1966, when a group of 51 black pastors, calling themselves the National Committee of Negro Churchmen (NCNC), bought a full page ad in The New York Times to publish their "Black Power Statement," which proposed a more aggressive approach to combating racism using the Bible for inspiration. People of this faith commonly believe that Jesus Christ was a Negro.

Black theology turns religion into sociology, and Jesus into a black Marxist rebel. While making statements against whites and Asians, it promotes a poor self-image among blacks, and describes the black man as a helpless victim of forces and people beyond his control. Black theology calls for political liberation instead of spiritual salvation.

Fundamentally, it is not Bible-based, Christ-honoring theology from this critical viewpoint. Black theologians use the language of "economic parity" and references to "mal-distribution" as nothing more than channeling the views of Karl Marx.

James Cone, Cornel West and Rev. Jeremiah Wright have worked to incorporate Marxist thought into the black church, forming an ethical framework predicated on a system of oppressor class versus a victim much like Marxism.[2]

The National Review has criticized black liberation theology, saying, "A scarcely concealed, Marxist-inspired indictment of American capitalism pervades contemporary 'black-liberation theology'...The black intellectual's goal is to "aid in the destruction of America as he knows it." Such destruction requires both black anger and white guilt. The black-power theologian's goal is to tell the story of American oppression so powerfully and precisely that white men will "tremble, curse, and go mad, because they will be drenched with the filth of their evil." In the preface to his 1970 book, A Black Theology of Liberation, Wright wrote: "There will be no peace in America until whites begin to hate their whiteness, asking from the depths of their being: 'How can we become black?'"[3]

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Part of this article consists of modified text from Metapedia, page http:en.metapedia.org/wiki/Black liberation theology and/or Wikipedia, page http:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black liberation theology, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.