Americas

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The Irish were the first slaves into the Americas.

The Americas are lands in the Western hemisphere, also known as the New World. In English, the plural form the Americas is often used to refer to the landmasses of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. Originally was used to call the South America only as the Italian navigator Amerigo Vespucci travelled on the Brazilian and Argentinan coast. In the United States of America the term America is more commonly used to refer to their country.[1] The Americas cover 8.3% of the Earth's total surface area (28.4% of its land area) and contain about 13.5% of the human population (about 900 million people).

Videos

How Whites Took Over America
How Whites Took Over America Part 2

References

  1. ↑ "America." The Oxford Companion to the English Language (ISBN 0-19-214183-X). McArthur, Tom, ed., 1992. New York: Oxford University Press, p. 33: "[16c: from the feminine of Americus, the Latinized first name of the explorer Amerigo Vespucci (1454-1512). A claim is also made for the name of Richard Ameryk, sheriff of Bristol and patron of John Cabot (Giovanni Caboto), the 16c Anglo-Italian explorer of North America. The name America first appeared on a map in 1507 by the German cartographer Martin Waldseemüller, referring to the area now called Brazil]. Since the 16c, a name of the western hemisphere, often in the plural Americas and more or less synonymous with the New World. Since the 18c, a name of the United States of America. The second sense is now primary in English: ... However, the term is open to uncertainties: ..."
Part of this article consists of modified text from Metapedia, page http:en.metapedia.org/wiki/Americas and/or Wikipedia, page http:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Americas, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.